Packs

DG1 ‘Spitfire’ Assault Pack

$210.00

Designed to be agile, just like its ancestor from WW2, it fits a very unique roll of short-range high-speed operations. The DG1 is the perfect pack to stow your helmet, NVG’s, extra magazines, IFAK, and hydration with room to spare. Given its small footprint it allows for easy movement in tight spaces where larger packs can become cumbersome.

  • Main enclosed compartment
  • Helmet compartment
  • Double STANAG sized side pockets
  • Compression straps
  • Front utility pocket
  • Two admin pockets
  • PALS on the back to be attachable to larger rucks
  • Shoulder straps
  • Sternum strap
  • waist belt
  • hydration ports
  • 6 points of compression

10 reviews for DG1 ‘Spitfire’ Assault Pack

  1. Raymond Floro

    The DG1 Spitfire is my everyday carry bag. Excellent features. Convenient access. Love the beaver tail compartment and side pouches. Quality product. Top customer service.

  2. SSD

    These are great. Truly awesome.

  3. Mark

    My new rapid aerial response pack. Bloody solid and bloody brilliant. This baby is robust and comfortable. Beaver tail takes my helmet and jacket, and all the essentials fit inside the streamlined main sack and main external pocket – and you can add pouches if you really need to.

    MOLLE it onto a MULE and jerrycans, portapumps or chainsaws can be carried with you hands free.

    Team it with a DG3 for extended remote area work and you have a line pack and helipad pack integrated for insert/extract but easily separated on the fire ground.

    Sweet!!!

  4. Brett Parker

    I just wanted to thank you guys for your awesome packs. I own two Crossfire packs and a pair of peacekeeper boots. Needless to say, I’m a fan. I have the long-range DG8 and also a DG1 sniper in auscam. Both of these packs have been superb out in the field.

    The DG8 I’ve taken on a number of high-country trips with substantial weight. After all the abuse it’s taken, it has not a single thread out of place. Quite frankly, the things a tank. It may be a tad heavier than other brands, but if you don’t like the thought of your pack dropping a shoulder strap with 40+ kgs of payload and having to lug it out of the bush held together with zip ties, then crossfire packs are the packs for you!

    The DG1 sniper is perfect for day trips and even slightly longer trips.

    The wet boggy mud that us Victorians often move through in places like the Otways chews up most gear pretty fast. The moment that mud soaks its way into seams, most gear starts falling apart. The thick scrub is also full of sharp blackberry bushes. But the ruggedness and tank-like build of the crossfire packs just shake it off without a single misplaced seam or jammed up zipper.

    The wet boggy mud that us Victorians often move through in places like the Otways chews up most gear pretty fast. The moment that mud soaks its way into seams, most gear starts falling apart. The thick scrub is also full of sharp blackberry bushes. But the ruggedness and tank like build of the Crossfire packs just shake it off without a single misplaced seam or jammed up zipper.

    The military origins of your DG8 really shine when on extended trips. Externally attaching those tricky things like extra tent poles, tripods, lightweight fold up tables or chairs are a breeze with this pack.

    I believe this pack blows up to something like an 80-90 litre range when fully unfurled. I’ve had this thing overflowing with gear on extended trips, yet you wouldn’t know it by how it carries. With over 40kgs I’ve picked it up by a single shoulder strap day after day. Needless to say I haven’t handled this pack gently and whilst no manufacturer recommends handling your pack this way, the DG8 just keeps on keeping on. I’ve had it covered in mud, soaked in blood and rain, I’ve had it frozen solid after leaving it out in -5c conditions. It still has not a single seam out of place!

    You can buy lighter packs, you can buy cheaper packs, you can buy more fancy packs too. Packs with silent magnetic closures, fleece coverings and all the bells and whistles. But if you want a pack that you can truly rely on when it really counts, you can’t go past a Crossfire.

    So thanks Crossfire team. Love the packs! I’m proud to haul Crossfire gear

  5. Manny

    I’m ex-ADF/RAAF and I wanted a pack to support my weekend 1-day ruck marches to keep fit in retirement for off/on track rucks in low/high country including rock scrambling in the wet/dry, so I got a DG-1 after I read “short-range, high-speed operations” in the specs. This ruck lives up to that statement. Everything about this ruck including the body design, harnessing, beaver tail storage, fastex clips, 500D cordura and even down to the unique “Lost Arrow” attachment system from the early DG-1 Sniper 60 L, 3-day assault pack I still have, are integrated into a versatile load carrying system. The DG-1 got rid of my weight balancing issues I had when rock scrambling or rucking on uneven terrain in my early gen. DG-1 Sniper. It was worth the effort of two ruck marches to sort out my optimal loadout to match the load carrying capacity of the DG-1 shoulder harness to a comfortable weight; enough to have the DG-1 strapped on me for 4-5 hour straight without any discomfort. Highly recommend this Next Gen. DG-1 ; just match your loadout to match YOUR short-range, high-speed ops. This ruck is in a class of its own and I won’t make the mistake of comparing it to my AUSCAM DG-1 Sniper in 1000D Cordura, padding and heavier straps, fastex buckles/clips.

  6. Ironside

    The DG1 goes everywhere with me. Can’t go past it’s quality and versatility.

  7. service_rifle_shooter

    Crossfire DG1 Spitfire. I just got this a few weeks ago to serve as a day pack for when I go shooting and don’t want to take the kitchen sink.

    Fits everything I need in it including the following:
    – 4 litres of water
    – 80 rounds of spare .223 or 40 of .30-06
    – peltour comtac headphones
    – bush hat and gloves
    – rear bag
    – lightweight shooting mat
    – data book
    – laser rangefinder (Leica 2800)
    – kestrel weather meter
    – field maintenance kit
    – iFAK including TQ
    – snacks (skittles?)

    There is room for a few more things like wet weather gear and I could certainly subtract some items there too.
    Overall the pack seems well put together and designed. I’ve owned and currently own a lot of packs and this is one of my favourites.

  8. Milamber Endaevor

    I use mine as a range bag. Works great.

  9. Northern Warrior

    This small “jack sack” in modern terms is ideal for the Minimalist Person. (Know your kit)

    It features a main zipped compartment capable of holding a PRC354, Spare Battery, Issue Water bottle or Hydration Bladder with some extra room for Extra Ammo and my Arktis Rainshield & Wet weather gloves.

    The Helmet carrier part is capable of holding a Issued Helmet but it can be a bit fiddly at points! So loosen the straps all the way and you’re laughing

    There is another zip compartment at the bottom of the Daysack (just below the Patch) I tend to keep this empty in case i’m given any other kit or there is some Mission Specific that I need to take and i can re-juggle what goes where in terms of my jacket or some food so its easier to reach

    On the side are two small vertical zip pouches that I keep my headtorch and spare batteries (waterproofed). In the other one my HMNVS (PVS14) fits really well with my custom pouch i had made!

    Overall, it is a really good “JackSack” able to sustain you for 12-24 hours. But thats all it is, dont try ramming a bouncing bomb in there as it wont work.

  10. RV

    Excited to have this as the latest addition to my ruck lineup.

    One thing I look for when choosing a ruck is versatility. Being out of the military, my use cases for a ruck can vary between a work bag, a diaper bag, a ruck for actual rucking , or just a multipurpose bag (that I might take to a hockey practice or game).

    Excited for many more years’ worth out of my Spitfire, thanks.

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